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> [REVIEW] DS-TT
JohnVS
messaggio Thursday 31 January 2008 - 12:57
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DSTT
[ English Version | Versione Italiana ]


Quick Links
Homepage: www.ndstt.com

Our heartfelt thanks to Ultragames for providing the sample.

The Nintendo DS flashcard's scene is undeniable mature: all the big players gave their best, creating extremely refined solutions with ever more "collateral" features, thanks to the almost complete knowledge of Nintendo's gaming hardware. Neverthless, a new brand would occasionally join the match: this is how Team TT introduces itself, releasing its very first product, a simple and low-cost Slot 1 flashcard aptly named DSTT.

Here we are again at our workbench, ready to squeeze 'till the end this new flash kit, unveiling its secrets, strong and weak points; in our review every curiosity you have will be fulfilled.

Introduction & Features

Before starting, it's best to clarify that, no matter the now widespread rumors, this flashcard isn't absolutely related to the -deservingly- famous R4 Revolution, already reviewed on this site and currently powering many of your DS'es. It's indeed assembled in the same factory that gave birth to the aforementioned flash kit, yet the DSTT is a completely different product, to the point that it's also marketed, along with a few accessories, as the Top Toy DS, a Neoflash product. However, the software that powers the card is, partially or completely, derivated from the R4 OS: the Action Replay cheats database, for instance, is fully compatible as long as you don't use an encrypted one.
Having debunked this myth, we can now begin our review by placing the TT in the same vein as the R4 and M3 DS Simply, a Slot 1 unit marked by ease of use and mainteinance, identical to a standard issue Nintendo cartridge and with virtually enormous storage capabilities granted by high-capacity microSD's.


The similarities with said brands are absolutely obvious: this is positive though, considering this design's prerogatives. Furthermore, the operating system is easy to use and completely customizable, by now a fairly standard feature.

But let's now take a look at the features breakdown, as declared by the manufacturer:
  • DS original cartridge size, Slot1 interface
  • Plug 'n Play, easy to use, just Drag 'n Drop file from PC to flash memory card
  • No FlashMe, built-in NoPass, and the GBA cards in slot2 can be started directly
  • Supports CleanROM, No covert
  • 100% SDHC TF and standard TF compatibility up to 4TB(4096GB) flash memory card
  • High speed SDHC. Supports any TF card speed with no lag in game
  • Save directly to TF card, not to onboard chip, Never lose your saves
  • Automatically detect and generate save type
  • Supports Moonshell and homebrew. DLDI auto-patching
  • Supports FAT/FAT32, works on any OS.
  • Supports Action Replay cheat and edit the code base.
  • Built-in energy-saving design.
  • User friendly skinnable interface. Touchscreen or button operation. Supports Skin DIY.
  • Supports the “Hot-Key” SOFT RESET.
  • Supports the WiFi game, DS Rumble Pak, DS Browser.
  • Supports Download play.
  • Supports 4-scale-lightness adjustment (DS Lite only ).
  • Free SDHC high-speed reader, Ultimate copy documents.
Notice how the microSD reader was mentioned as a feature: we guess a freebie is always something to be proud of. Nothing particularly remarkable on this list: except for a few notable cases, the TT features are the de facto standard of actual flashcarts. Support for high capacity memory cards, full compatibility with Action Replay cheat codes to obtain the best from your games and the indeed useful soft reset button combo, which makes getting back to the cart system menu without rebooting your system a breeze; this neat load of features comes for about 30€.

Whether this is truly a candidate for the R4 throne or a passenger on the train for oblivion, we'll find out in our review.


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JohnVS
messaggio Friday 1 February 2008 - 15:24
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Inside the Box


The SDA plastic envelope is now sitting on our workbench, with the sample securedly housed within. We do have to complain with Poste Italiane's express courier: no matter how carefully the package was prepared, it was clear how it withstood quite an abuse, probably being shipped under the weight of other boxes...

As usual, cutting it open allowed us to free the content, a cardboard envelope containing the DSTT, whose packaging is shown in the images below.





It takes only a quick glance to notice how essential the box is: the front sports the flashcard logo on a black background, with the usual "for NDS/NDSL" markings printed in the top left corner, in reflective letters; the lower margin shows the manufacturer's website (which will be useful later on, when the user will be required to download the system software, an issue we'll further discuss) and the logos for the micro Secure Digital and Secure Digital High Capacity standards respectively.

On the back, a full list of the TT's features is available to the user: in short, it's the same we mentioned in the previous paragraph, complete with Engrish (it wouldn't be fun, otherwise). We found amusing how the CE and "please dispose of carefully" logos have been printed on the box: sure, we admire the attention TT Team showed towards ecology, but we highly doubt the average user would be so prone on getting rid of his brand new flashcard smile.gif

Now, the sides: besides the three refractive icons clearly inspired by the PSP's trademark games, music, movies triad, we can find a small list of three items.
  • GBA512M
  • Rumble Pak
  • GBA & BROWSER
And here comes our dilemma: the provided sample didn't include any of these and we've been reassured it was the only one available from one of the manufacturer's official dealers (and a pretty famous one, to top it all). In spite of that, a deluxe package inclusive of GBA/RAM and Rumble pack, a USB charge cable and a miniCD with the operating system, along with a smaller one with only the Rumble Pack are sold at some e-shops. We will discuss this in a while, but we can't solve the riddle right now due to how the team systematically ignored our attempts to contact them.



Let's go ahead and open the box, where a plastic tray resides: after some fumbling, we managed to pull it out and access the DSTT itself, along with a compact microSD reader/keyring, available in blue or orange (fate will decide which one you get, though!). Unfortunately, the bad habit of not including any quick manual or driver disc has spread even to this new team: the user has to figure the card's functions by himself, or browse the official site.
We can't say we're satisfied by the card's packaging: its sturdiness has been demonstrated by its unceremonious delivery, but little will it do to guide a first-time users left staring at the card and microSD reader, wondering how to get everything the features list promised. Indeed, Slot 1 designs make software discs obsolete, yet not everyone is knowledgeable enough to set up the TT on his own, let alone the fact that said required files are available only via the official site. To sum it up, we're far, far away from G6 tin boxes, and even farther from the latest Supercards' superb ones, even though its resilience against damage impressed us.
As we mentioned, multiple accessories exist, ranging from a system disc to the mandatory GBA/Rumble/RAM packs up to a USB battery charger, but finding them is easier said than done. We diligently mailed the manufacturer for an official statement, but we were left without an answer, which proved to be somewhat annoying. This review will be updated accordingly, but for now we will continue our tests using the sample we were gently provided.



About the micro USB card reader: this is the first time we've found such a small one bundled with a flashcard. Lightweight, discreet, easy to hook to your keyring; its usage is as simple and elegant as it gets. The entire circuitry is housed in a clear plastic sleeve and can be freed by simply sliding your thumb over the top side; the microSD is inserted into the reader through a tiny slot on the top and the entire apparatus is then plugged into your favorite USB 2.0 port for easy and fast transfer of games, homebrews and updates. So simple, so cool.
Nevertheless, we wouldn't advise using too much this particular card reader: in addition to being a little too tiny for our taste, our sampe had an odd habit of getting stuck into the USB port, along with scratching the borders of our microSD card, whose extraction requires you to use your fingernails, due to the lack of a spring-loaded mechanism.





Finally, the flashcard itself. Just like an R4, the DSTT is protected by a handy plastic box, not different from those housing common memory cards; on top of that, it's shaped like a DS cartridge, which is a neat touch.
Once opened, the TT immediately slides out, falling into our hands: the overall build is excellent, with a sturdy plastic case identical to a standard issue Nintendo cartridge. The top right corner is where the microSD slot is located, while a glossy sticker covers the front, without concealing exposed circuitry underneath. White is the only available color of this product, so no hopes of getting a unit matching your carefully repainted DS: furthermore, we strongly advise not to try and open up the flashcard! Oddly enough, our sample showed how the two halves were kept together by tiny plastic bridges glued together, which made reassembling the unit not an easy task.
What we were very impressed by is the extremely accurate spring mechanism: a common flaw of other kits we tested is how, for aesthetics' sake, the microSD has to be pushed beyond the limit of the card's top margin, making the usage of one's fingernail almost mandatory. This is not the case, as a fingertip is more than enough to smoothly insert and eject the memory card, given you're willing to look over the less-than-a-millimetre sticking out.

As a closing note, a look at the DStT innards. Due to the little significance it bears for the end user, we routinely avoid removing the protective casing: however, this time we decided to take our examination farther. The overall quality of the printed board is more than average, with well-defined tracks running across both sides, using the same manufacturing processes as the old DS-Link. However, what's soldered on the board is what really caught our attention, and not in a good way. The various elements are poorly assembled, sometimes even not aligned, with an overall feeling of cheapness and rush, obvious to an expert eye. This is nowhere near the carefully designed and accurately built circuitry of an R4.





This is an image of how the DSTT looks once ready and inserted into the DS console: it behaves and feels just like a normal came card. To sum it up, this flashcard looks well designed on the outside, but a riddle on the inside: well-built, sturdy, with the best spring-loaded microSD slot we've seen so far, yet we can not shake off the doubts we had while looking at the circuit board, which really suffers from an approximative manufacturing.
Let's now take into account the more practical aspects of the DSTT.


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Release List EURO e USA aggiornata settimanalmente:
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JohnVS
messaggio Monday 4 February 2008 - 10:49
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Getting Started

When it comes to setting up the DSTT, things can't get any simpler.
As shown above, the only thing we have to do is insert our (already prepared) microSD into its slot and plug the flashcard into our DS unit. No onboard memory chip makes USB cables or external, G6-like writers unnecessary; integrated card readers and the one bundled with the TT makes managing the card's content a breeze.

We mentioned how the memory card has to be prepared neverthless: said process merely involves loading the latest system software and copying it into the microSD root directory.



This is how everything looks once we copied the files over: the Games directory is our addition for easier management of games and saves; the OS can load them from every position, although the TT's user manual includes said folder's creation as part of the setup procedure. We also decided to show you the USRCHEAT.DAT file, found within the TTMenu directory: it's obvious just how much this card "borrows" from the R4, and this is further proof. As you can see, the cheats database is nothing but an unencrypted R4 one, we guess generated by the R4 Cheat Tool. The first line of text, which reads:

CODICE
R4 CheatCode     Cheat Code v1.02 Date: 2007/05/20

leaves no room for further speculation. Out of curiosity, we swapped it with the official cheat repository from the 1.15 R4 update (the most recent as this article is being written), which resulted in the OS crashing while trying to load it. The cheating system is among the portions of the OS that were reverse-engineered.





A special mention for the flashcard's bootstrap screens: while the bottom one will stay white, on the top one a cute, manga-like rendition of an ASCII Art-like microSD notifies the user of faulty memory cards or corrupted system software. It got us smiling.


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JohnVS
messaggio Tuesday 5 February 2008 - 12:18
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GUI & System Software


Lett's now take a closer look at the software side of this flashcart. Keep in mind that you can very well opt to use the NeoFlash version of the OS, which is absolutely identical minus the customized skin.

Being capable of acting as a third-gen Passcard, after the health and safety screen you'll be immediately redirected to the DSTT main menu, with a wait of roughly four to five seconds. Whether you like this feature or not, it's your choice, neverthless even the blasoned Supercard DS ONE follows the same behavior.

The boot sequence is actually made of two separate phases: first there's a microD check, followed by the OS and skin being loaded into memory; ROM listing, cheats and savegames loading follow right after. As complex as it might sound, it's actually pretty useful should the need for troubleshooting arise.



The top screen shows two info boxes, displaying the game icon, name, size (note that it's the filesize, not the retail cartridge's), internal ID and the date of the last savegame, while the latter is empty, with indications within the sourcecode that it can be used to display game-specific notes. On the bottom right corner, the current software revision is displayed.

The bottom screen displays a simple file browser, with a configuration button and file counter on the upper part. It offers a pretty standard visualization, with every file ordered by name and columns displaying the size and icon aswell; as shown in the picture above, just under the name a set of several icons is displayed, whose explanation is as follows.
  • - Soft reset enabled
  • - Direct Memory Access enabled
  • - Download Play fix
  • - Cheats available and enabled
  • - Additional options available (also by pressing SELECT)
Actually, the last icon is shown for every game or homebrew, accessing a sub-menu we'll better explain in a little while. Finally, on the right border, we have the usual slide bar, way too slow for being even remotely useful tough: there is about one and half second lag in refreshing the game list.



General configuration: to be honest, we wonder what exactly is there to configure, as the only real option is enabling soft reset by default for each game; everything else is just a set of buttons for booting a Slot 2 card in DS (PASSME Mode) or GBA mode (GBA Mode), switching off the system and adjust the LCD brightness, given you're using a DS Lite or DS Classic v5 (a shortcut for this feature, the L shoulder button, has been added in firmware revision 1.08). Oddity of a few features aside (seriously, the power button is not that difficult to reach...), we would've preferred something giving the end-user slightly more control over the card's behavior.
The "barebone" feeling also stretches to the game specific submenu, which is made of just three settings:
  • DMA Mode: Direct Memory Access, useful with slow microSD's and certain games
  • Softreset: enables the soft reset feature, by pressing at the same time A+B+X+Y+L+R while in-game
  • Cheat: enables/disables cheats

The latter can also be managed via a few in-game shortcuts introduced with the 1.08 system update, namely L+R+START+UP (on) and L+R+START+DOWN (off), although single cheats still have to be chosen beforehand by tapping the Cheat button found in this submenu, whereas X and Y respectively mass-activate and mass-deactivate the entire cheats list for the selected game.
The codes are standard Action Replay ones and can be easily added and managed with the R4 Cheat Code Editor; we want to remind you that, although the DSTT cheating subsystem has been reverse-engineered from the R4's, databases encrypted for the latter will prove useful only if you wish to experience a system crash. Oh, and don't forget to save your changes via the eponymous button on the lower left of the touch screen!

Skinning: as we've come to expect, it's easier done than said. The graphics are divided into small, self-explanatory files, with a .ini config file for basic CSS-style editing of text and borders. Everything you need is Photoshop (or Paint, why not) and the HEX code for your favorite color.
Yet we have to complain for the complete lack of a skin selector: whenever you'll feel like installing a new one, you'll be forced to overwrite or rename the default one.

In short, this TTMenu hasn't quite convinced you: we appreciate the attempt of using a proprietary OS instead of a customized Moonshell, as with the latest Supercard and EZ products, but it still lacks the flexibility and features of such elaborate flashcarts. To be honest, everything screams of "rip-off": game information are stored in an internal database, akin to what the old DS Link did (whereas most of it rivals extract them from the ROM), DMA mode has always been a key point of Supercard models prior to its adoption by other manufacturers, and everything else has plain been reverse-engineered from an old R4 system software. Keep in mind: it works, doing its job without complaining and without too much hassle, but that's where a few other flaws kick in.
True, we might be asking for too much from a sub-30€ card, but we can't drive away the thought of more advanced and complete solutions, let alone that dčją vu feeling all the features borrowed from the R4 gave us.


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Release List EURO e USA aggiornata settimanalmente:
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Evrain
messaggio Wednesday 6 February 2008 - 22:01
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Compatibility and Performance

After so much talking, let's get down to business: how does the DSTT performs once put in use? The answer is given by our tests.






For this review, we chose to perform them on a total of six Nintendo DS'es of varying model and software, evaluating not only the output of the provided sample, but also the data from twelve more DSTT's kindly given to us by a fellow Community member, for a grand total of fourteen.
here's the detailed breakdown:
  • Two sets of DSTT's, one made of twelve retail units imported from the States, one Italian retail unit and our sample
  • Nintendo DS "Classic" v3 (with FlashMe v7), Nintendo DS "Classic" v4, Nintendo DS Lite v7
  • Kingston microSD 1GB, Kingston microSD High Capacity 4Gb
Even though a 4 Gb microSDHC was used, keep in mind that the results refer, unless otherwise specified, to tests performed with the 1 Gb one, due to this being the average user's setup. All memory cards are either new or restored to factory settings via formatting.
The latest revision of the system software, version 1.08, was used, enabling soft reset by default and disabling DMA mode.

Homebrew

Using a homebrew program or game is quick and effortless on the DSTT, as we've come to expect from Slot 1 flashcarts: the DLDI driver included in the OS automatically patches the file on-the-fly, making external patchers and the like utterly obsolete. We tested Moonshell, DS-Linux and DSOrganize, all three working flawlessly.

DS Games

And now, DS games. What follows is the complete list of the titles we tested, their color showing their compatibility.
    Donkey Kong: Jungle Climber
    CSI: Dark Motives
    Real Football 2008
    Warhammer 40k: Squad Command
    Drawn to Life
    Mario Party DS
    Megaman Star Force: Dragon
    Pro Evolution Soccer 2008
    Contra 4
    Advance Wars: Days of Ruin
    Pokčmon Diamante
    Sonic Rush Adventure
    The Legend of Spyro: A New Beginning
    Asterix & Obelix at the Olympic Games
    New Zealand Story
    New Super Mario Bros
    Yu-GiOh! World Championship 2007
    Zoo Keeper
    Bubble Bobble: Double Shot
    Another Code: Two Memories
    Nanostray
    Electroplankton
    Pac'n Roll
    Lost in Blue
    Kirby Canvas Course
    Battles of Prince of Persia
    Burnout Legends
    Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time
    Fifa Street 2
    James Pond
    Puyo Pop Fever
    Cooking Mama
    Yoshi's Island DS
    Zendoku
    Ratatouille
    42 All-time Classics
    Animal Crossing
    Bee Movie
    Brain Training
    More Brain Training
    Crash Bandicoot Titans
    Ferrari Challenge
    Giulia Baby-sitter
    Giulia Passione Stilista
    Left or Right
    Luxor: Pharaoh's Challenge
    Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games
    Mario Kart DS
    Metroid Prime Hunters
    Ultimate Mortal Kombat DS
    Mistery Detective
    Shrek the Third
    Tetris DS
    The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

In the end, we achieved full compatibility. We said "in the end" due to the effort it took to ascertain it: while a few units showed no flaws, others were plagued by anomalous compatibility, loading errors and random OS crashings. We tested both the v1.08 system software and its previous version, yet the flashcard's behavior remained erratic, with some units being fixed and others staying troublesome.
Neverthless, a few microSD formats and OS reinstallations proved to solve most of these situations (not all of them, though). Another myth we should debunk is its allegedly fast loading times: our tests showed that the DSTT is no faster than its rivals, and even somewhat slower with fragmented data.

Data fragmenting is also the cause of many OS crashes: both us and a many Community members noticed how, after a while, the OS would stop responding, or loading altogether, requiring either a reinstall or a full format of the microSD.

Savefiles are 512Kb uncompressed, no matter the game, and yes, they're identical to those the R4 outputs, space consumption and all. Another reverse engineered feature.

Download Play

Download Play is fundamental for those wishing for a quick play with friends who don't own, or own too few, game cartridges, and was possibly the most difficult feature whose performance we assessed. Usually, it's a matter of "working" or "not working", but our TT's instead chose to play a few tricks on us.
A first set of test, performed on our twelve import cards, left us with a stunning 0% compatibility, with the receiving DS crashing at the Nintendo logo with every game, even with FlashMe installed; we kept formatting the memory card and reinstalling the OS, but the problem persisted on every single unit. On top of that, the remaining two samples (both of them Italian retail units) caused no problems whatsoever.
We're brought to think it's either the worst luck we ever had, with an entire batch of defective flashcarts, or a hardware revision the manufacturer released without notice; again, due to the TT team's inexplicable silence, we can't confirm or deny anything.


--------------------
Just keep tryin'
Keep on flyin'
I will be the light...

- from Last Exile: Cloud Age Symphony -


Togisumasareta tsume wo hate ima kagayaku tame ni sono kiba wo muke...
Shiren wa norikoerarenai hito ni osoikakari wa shinai!

- from Megaman X8: Wild Fang -


Proud supporter of EVAC Industry co.ltd.
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Evrain
messaggio Thursday 7 February 2008 - 15:38
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Final Thoughts

It's time to write down our final notes on this DSTT flashcard. Even though its low price tag and full compatibility can be alluring, what you get is exactly what you pay for it: this is not just an attempt at emulating an R4, the TT is a plain clone of said flashcart. The circuit board's quality is questionable, quite different from its solid plastic shell and precise microSD slot; same goes for its OS, who has won our praise for keeping up with that tradition of ease-of-use the R4 heralded, yet flawed by an unrefined design and that unnerving habit of locking up whenever the microSD suffers from even slight data fragmentation.
Another thing we didn't like a single bit was the reliability (or lack thereof) of the manufacturer: whenever we review a flashcard, we always work in close contact with the developer in order to obtain as much technical data as possible on the sample we're testing; the TT team instead systematically ignored our e-mails, leaving us dubious on the kind of future support they might offer on their product. Actually, this is the first time such a thing occured.
In short, this is the best options for those in search for an inexpensive, basic flash kit, but if you also demand reliability, special functions and smooth operation, you'd better look elsewhere.

Let's take a look at the card's pro's and con's:

Pro's
+ Excellent shell durability
+ 100% compatible with both single play and Download Play
+ Integrated PassMe function
+ Easily skinnable
+ A microSDHC reader bundled in for free
+ Capable of taking advantage from R4's support programs and cheat database


Con's
- Inner hardware manufactured hastily and with mediocre components
- Simplistic system software
- Lack of an integrated media player, although Moonshell runs flawlessly
- Lack of a driver disc, included only in the card's (hypothetical) more expensive packs
- Manufacturer's reliability is highly debatable
- Unstable performance
- Quite sensitive to fragmented data


Packaging
Build and Materials
Compatibility
Special Functions


Review written by Evrain for GBARL.it. Thanks to nexus81 and skysurf for assisting with the compatibility and performance tests.
Unauthorized copying and editing is forbidden outside of Network RL.


--------------------
Just keep tryin'
Keep on flyin'
I will be the light...

- from Last Exile: Cloud Age Symphony -


Togisumasareta tsume wo hate ima kagayaku tame ni sono kiba wo muke...
Shiren wa norikoerarenai hito ni osoikakari wa shinai!

- from Megaman X8: Wild Fang -


Proud supporter of EVAC Industry co.ltd.
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